Gomez steps down as Panama coach. : Weekly News Roundup, July 18th, 2018




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Welcome to the Panama Weekly News Roundup! Here’s the latest.

Gomez steps down as Panama coach.

Hernan Dario Gomez said on Tuesday that he was quitting as coach of Panama after leading the nation to their first World Cup finals.

“Now, for me, it is the time for the difficult act of moving my feet from the place where I have put my heart,” wrote the Colombian coach, who is known as Bolillo, in a letter published by the Panamanian football federation.

Panamanian media reported that Gomez was taking over Ecuador, which finished eighth in the 10-team World Cup qualifying group and failed to reach Russia.

Gomez coached Ecuador from 1999 to 2004 and led them to the 2002 World Cup, four years after guiding his native Colombia to the finals. Gomez took charge of Panama in 2014 and led them to the third qualifying place in the final regional group, thanks to an 88th minute goal in their last game, which allowed them to edge Honduras on goal difference and the United States by a point.

Source: Gulf Today

Glenfarne raises USD 700m for investments in Chile, Panama.

US-based energy and infrastructure developer Glenfarne Group LLC has secured up to USD 700 million (EUR 598m) in capital for new investments in the Americas, including for hydropower purchases.

Glenfarne’s unit EnfraGen LLC will use the fresh funds to support the growth of two of its own subsidiaries, namely Prime Energia SpA and Fontus Hydro LLC. More specifically, Prime Energia will use the proceeds to fund the construction of five backup power stations in Chile that will help adopt more renewable energy onto the local electrical grid. A portion of the funds will also be used to refinance existing debt.

Source: Renewables Nowf

Panama President Retreating in Face of Protests Over Increased Power Tariffs.

Panama President, Juan Carlos Varela, admitted protests over higher power tariffs created a crisis and left open the possibility of revoking it, in the face of mounting demonstrations today demanding its elimination.

‘It is the responsibility of the Executive and Legislative powers to assess whether there is a possible fiscal way out for the State or Government to cover the increase for six months’, the President told reporters, although he insisted that while this does not happen, the increase will be maintained.

He criticized what he called violent acts by university students clashing with the police, that caused wounds to an agent by what he called ‘little radical groups’ who faced the anti-riot forces that vacated the blocked street facing the University of Panama.

Source: Prensa Latina

 

High Quality, Affordable Health Care in Panama

Navigating the Panama health care system can be a daunting task for a foreigner. Finding the right doctor, insurance, medication, and emergency services can be difficult at first. But, luckily, Panama has some of the best quality health care in the Americas, and at a cost that is more often than not, reasonable and fair.

Health insurance in Panama is also affordable. There are plans that range from basic coverage to full, advanced medical care, to cover a variety of needs and budgets. For basic coverage, you can get a plan as low as $30-$40 a month, and it goes up from there, depending on what procedures it covers. Many insurance companies offer 80%-100% coverage for their more advanced plans.

Source: POLS Blog

 

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